Featured Images

Rather than take the reader’s time with self-important rambling, I want to use this page to introduce my photographs. I will be adding images to this page frequently. If you’re intrigued, please visit my Gallery and also take a look at the other photographs on the site.

Sunset on Mt. Scott – Wichita Mountains NWR, Cache, OK

This first photograph is a very early one for me. It is a rare, for me, 35mm photograph because, back in the “film days”, I usually used 6×7 or 4×5. It is my first published photograph and has appeared in several publications.

The image was made from the top of Mt. Scott in southern Oklahoma. Mt. Scott is in the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge near Lawton. This is a rugged area inhabited by buffalo (I know it’s supposed to be “bison” but I just can’t bring myself to use that term), elk, turkey, wild longhorn cattle, mountain boomers (“collared lizard sounds so dull), deer, and rattlesnakes among other species, Here the animals run free and the people are warned to be alert for them.

The Wichita Mountains were revered by the Kiowa, Comanche and Apache. Geronimo and Quannah Parker are buried nearby. The land here is mixed grass prairie that has never been plowed dotted by low granite mountains that are really spectacular. It’s the beginning of the American Southwest. This area is one of Oklahoma’s jewels and one of her best kept secrets.

The photograph was made at the end of a long, hot summer day of hiking in the refuge. I had a brand new 200mm lens for my Pentax MX and when I saw the sun begin to set I thought it would be ideal for the new lens. So I set my tripod up on a high rock and waited for the sun to move between the two trees. But what I imagined did not happen. As I waited, the sun began to disappear behind some clouds. I had to make the exposure earlier than I intended and shortly afterwards the sun was gone and never made it into the planned position. Some have criticized the image because the tree branch protrudes into the sun or because the sun is partially obscured by the clouds. A painter could make it “perfect” but, to me, those are the unscripted parts that make a photograph special.

Take time to view the image and my others. And, if you’re in the area, visit Oklahoma. It’s much more than you expect.

Featured Image – “Palo Duro Canyon”

Posted by on Apr 6, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Featured Image – “Palo Duro Canyon”

Palo Duro Canyon A hot summer day from the floor of Palo Duro Canyon in the Texas panhandle. This is a rather classic composition much in the same tradition as Ansel Adams’ Mt. Williamson. The photograph was made with 6×7 Fuji Velvia on a very hot summer day. The canyon is a Texas state park near Amarillo in the Texas panhandle. It’s the second largest canyon in the United States. You can walk or drive most anywhere in the park but watch out for the rattlesnakes. Palo Duro Canyon is a very special place!...

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Featured Image – “Sunset on Mt. Scott”

Posted by on Apr 3, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Featured Image – “Sunset on Mt. Scott”

Sunset on Mt. Scott These two crooked Juniper trees are the same ones that are in the opening installation of this blog. It was made a few years later with a Pentax 67 and a 105mm lens. The lens is shorter so the sun is not as large. The large 6×7 Velvia chrome provides much better image quality than the 35mm Kodachrome of the first one and the camera is set in an entirely different location. I had the first image in mind but wanted the 6×7 image quality. It’s interesting how different the two images are even though they are also clearly...

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Featured Image – “Garden of the Gods in Fog”

Posted by on Mar 28, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Featured Image – “Garden of the Gods in Fog”

“Garden of the Gods in Fog” First light and a bit of early morning fog in Colorado Springs’ “Garden of the Gods” or, as my grandchildren have renamed it “God’s Garden”. For those unfamiliar with Colorado Springs, this is a city park. It has to be one of the most spectacular city parks anywhere. What this image doesn’t show is the mule deer doe who walked up behind me to watch me work and then stood only a couple of feet away posing for her pictures while chewing her morning leaves. Quite a place.  ...

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Featured Image – “Lone Peak Mountain”

Posted by on Mar 18, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Featured Image – “Lone Peak Mountain”

Lone Peak Mountain is in northwest Oklahoma’s “Glass Mountain State Park”. These red bluffs look like something right of a Zane Grey novel. This is indeed the Old West. “Glass Mountain State Park” is an interesting name. Locals pronounce it “Gloss” but it’s usually spelled “Glass”.  There are some colorful stories about the name. One tale is that, when the area was first settled, a traveler from England called the area the “Glass Mountains” because of the sparkling selenite crystals in the mountains. But his British pronunciation of “glass” confused residents who began calling them the “Gloss” mountains and the pronunciation stuck. The park is right off of US Highway 412 west of Enid, OK. US 412 crosses the northern part of the state. The entire highway is a worthwhile drive with several significant areas along the route. Loan Peak Mountain and Cathedral Mountain are two of the major peaks but a local resident told me about “Dead Indian Mountain”. I don’t know if it’s the official name and I couldn’t find it until I drove into the setting sun. Sure enough, there on the south side of the highway, was the shape of a body laid out on the top of a bluff silhouetted against the sunset. This photograph was made with a Pentax 6×7 on Fujichrome Velvia color slide film while  on assignment for Oklahoma Today Magazine....

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Featured Image – “In Wildness is the Preservation of the World”

Posted by on Mar 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Featured Image – “In Wildness is the Preservation of the World”

Pioneering color photographer Eliot Porter quoted Thoreau for the title of his 1962 monograph, In Wildness is the Preservation of the World. This image reminded me of Porter’s work so I referred to his book in the title. I have often tried to capture in a photograph the wild tangle of natural order. I think this photograph does that. Look past the tangle of branches, leaves, and undergrowth to see the order of nature. Not the neatness we humans look for but the order from chaos that is natural order. This photograph was made about a week after the peak of fall color in Beaver’s Bend State Park in the southeastern corner of Oklahoma. I was near Lost Creek, a small creek that connects to the Mountain Fork river on both ends. Beaver’s Bend is a part of the Ouchita National Forest. It’s an area of mountains, forests, and extraordinary natural...

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Featured image – “Polychrome Pass in Clouds”

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

Featured image – “Polychrome Pass in Clouds”

Welcome. Thanks for taking the time to visit. Poke around awhile and enjoy the photographs. I’m glad you are here. I’m going to take the opening entries of this blog to introduce the photographs on the opening slide show. I chose them because they are ones with which I am especially pleased (and because I could get them to fit the shape needed for the slide show). So we’ll start with “Polychrome Pass in Clouds”.   Polychrome pass is in Denali National Park. After a long bus ride (the only way to get there) over a narrow gravel road this scene opened in front of me. The clouds obscuring the mountains and the flattened perspective of a long lens give a very abstract quality to the image.   Denali Park is like no other place. The distances here are vast (that valley is several miles across) and the treeless tundra emphasizes the vastness of the place. The river in the foreground is called a braided river because little streams within it wind around each other. In the spring, it runs full with snow-melt but in the summer, only the little streams remain. The colors in the hills give the place it’s name and behind those hills lurks the Big One – Denali. I was fortunate to come of age while living in Alaska and, 40 years later, the return trip was special. When I lived there, Alaska was isolated and remote. Now it is modern and yet still the Alaska I knew. It’s one of the world’s best places to...

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